distant-traveller:

A solar eclipse from the Moon

Has a solar eclipse ever been seen from the Moon? Yes, first in 1967 — but it may happen again next week. The robotic Surveyor 3 mission took thousands of wide angle television images of the Earth in 1967, a few of which captured the Earth moving in front of the Sun. Several of these images have been retrieved from the NASA archives and compiled into the above time-lapse video. Although the images are grainy, the Earth’s atmosphere clearly refracted sunlight around it and showed a beading effect when some paths were blocked by clouds. Two years later, in 1969, the Apollo 12 crew saw firsthand a different eclipse of the Sun by the Earth on the way back from the Moon. In 2009, Japan’s robotic Kaguya spacecraft took higher resolution images of a similar eclipse while orbiting the Moon. Next week, however, China’s Chang’e 3 mission, including its Yutu rover, might witness a new total eclipse of the Sun by the Earth from surface of the Moon. Simultaneously, from lunar orbit, NASA’s LADEE mission might also capture the unusual April 15 event. Another angle of this same event will surely be visible to people on Earth — a total lunar eclipse.

Image credit: NASA, Surveyor 3; Acknowledgement: R. D. Sampson (ECSU)

distant-traveller:

A solar eclipse from the Moon

Has a solar eclipse ever been seen from the Moon? Yes, first in 1967 — but it may happen again next week. The robotic Surveyor 3 mission took thousands of wide angle television images of the Earth in 1967, a few of which captured the Earth moving in front of the Sun. Several of these images have been retrieved from the NASA archives and compiled into the above time-lapse video. Although the images are grainy, the Earth’s atmosphere clearly refracted sunlight around it and showed a beading effect when some paths were blocked by clouds. Two years later, in 1969, the Apollo 12 crew saw firsthand a different eclipse of the Sun by the Earth on the way back from the Moon. In 2009, Japan’s robotic Kaguya spacecraft took higher resolution images of a similar eclipse while orbiting the Moon. Next week, however, China’s Chang’e 3 mission, including its Yutu rover, might witness a new total eclipse of the Sun by the Earth from surface of the Moon. Simultaneously, from lunar orbit, NASA’s LADEE mission might also capture the unusual April 15 event. Another angle of this same event will surely be visible to people on Earth — a total lunar eclipse.

Image credit: NASA, Surveyor 3; Acknowledgement: R. D. Sampson (ECSU)

(Source: apod.nasa.gov, via sagansense)

saveplanetearth:

Wind Power Has Cut U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions By 4.4 Percent: Report ~ Kate Sheppard @ Huffington Post

saveplanetearth:

Wind Power Has Cut U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions By 4.4 Percent: Report ~ Kate Sheppard @ Huffington Post

(via sagansense)

explore-blog:

Isaac Asimov in conversation with Bill Moyers about science, dogma, education, and creativity – a must-read.
derpycats:

I feel observed…

derpycats:

I feel observed…

humansofnewyork:

"I’m studying music therapy. I just finished observing a music program for children with disabilities, and I’m taking notes.""So what’s something you observed?""Many of the children had some form of autism. And it seemed that playing music together gave them the satisfaction of contributing to a group and forming relationships, without the pressure of having to speak or maintain eye contact."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m studying music therapy. I just finished observing a music program for children with disabilities, and I’m taking notes."
"So what’s something you observed?"
"Many of the children had some form of autism. And it seemed that playing music together gave them the satisfaction of contributing to a group and forming relationships, without the pressure of having to speak or maintain eye contact."

laboratoryequipment:

Climate Change Slowdown Linked to Sea Surface TempThe recent slowdown in the warming rate of the Northern Hemisphere may be a result of internal variability of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation — a natural phenomenon related to sea surface temperatures, according to Penn State researchers."Some researchers have in the past attributed a portion of Northern Hemispheric warming to a warm phase of the AMO," says Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor of Meteorology. "The true AMO signal, instead, appears likely to have been in a cooling phase in recent decades, offsetting some of the anthropogenic warming temporarily."Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/climate-change-slow-down-linked-sea-surface-temp

laboratoryequipment:

Climate Change Slowdown Linked to Sea Surface Temp

The recent slowdown in the warming rate of the Northern Hemisphere may be a result of internal variability of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation — a natural phenomenon related to sea surface temperatures, according to Penn State researchers.

"Some researchers have in the past attributed a portion of Northern Hemispheric warming to a warm phase of the AMO," says Michael Mann, Distinguished Professor of Meteorology. "The true AMO signal, instead, appears likely to have been in a cooling phase in recent decades, offsetting some of the anthropogenic warming temporarily."

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/climate-change-slow-down-linked-sea-surface-temp

rhamphotheca:

Rocky Mountain National Park - CO, USA
Don’t forget, it is the time of year Black Bears wake up from winter’s sleep! Bears will be lumbering across the park’s meadows and forests looking for food to eat. While Bear’s are omnivores around 80-90% of a Black Bear’s diet consists of vegetation and grubs. Their claws are shorter and more curved than other bear species, making perfect grips to climb trees. While hiking, look up and you may see one of the park’s Black Bears snoozing high up on a tree branch. Photo VIP Schonlau

rhamphotheca:

Don’t forget, it is the time of year Black Bears wake up from winter’s sleep! Bears will be lumbering across the park’s meadows and forests looking for food to eat. While Bear’s are omnivores around 80-90% of a Black Bear’s diet consists of vegetation and grubs. Their claws are shorter and more curved than other bear species, making perfect grips to climb trees. While hiking, look up and you may see one of the park’s Black Bears snoozing high up on a tree branch. 

Photo VIP Schonlau

m0rethanyoubargainedf0r:

Confused little baby

(via procyonvulpecula)